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Tuesday, October 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of etiology of idiopathic epilepsy. found in the catalog.

etiology of idiopathic epilepsy.

Harold Geist

etiology of idiopathic epilepsy.

by Harold Geist

  • 242 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Exposition Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Epilepsy.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliography.

    Other titlesIdiopathic epilepsy.
    StatementForeword by Charles Kram.
    SeriesAn Exposition-university book
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC372 .G4
    The Physical Object
    Pagination297 p.
    Number of Pages297
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5844193M
    LC Control Number62001202
    OCLC/WorldCa1593846

    In this scheme, the etiology of epilepsy is divided into four categories: idiopathic, symptomatic, provoked, and cryptogenic. These are defined and subcategories are proposed.   In contrast, epilepsy remained active in 30% of patients and became intractable in 10%, with the majority of those with active epilepsy or intractability having a non-idiopathic etiology.

    Epilepsy is a very complex disorder with many seizure types, syndromes, and defined causes. Major textbooks are typically organised around syndromes, but The Causes of Epilepsy takes a different approach and focuses on various causes. This 25 kg book is crammed with information: pages are separated into chapters written by authors from 21 : Peter Camfield.   ETIOLOGY: • Epileptic seizures are produced by abnormal discharges of neurons that may be caused any pathological process which affects the cortical layer of brain. • The classification of etiology of the epilepsy is divided into 4 main categories: • Idiopathic epilepsy: are those in which there is a clear genetic component. 5.

    Epilepsy Action is a charity that improves the lives of everyone affected by epilepsy. We give advice, improve healthcare, fund research and campaign for change. Epilepsy Action is the working name of British Epilepsy Association, a registered charity in England and Wales (No. ) and a company limited by guarantee (No. ) in England. An idiopathic disease is any disease with an unknown cause or mechanism of apparent spontaneous origin. From Greek ἴδιος idios "one's own" and πάθος pathos "suffering", idiopathy means approximately "a disease of its own kind". For some medical conditions, one or more causes are somewhat understood, but in a certain percentage of people with the condition, the cause may not be.


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Etiology of idiopathic epilepsy by Harold Geist Download PDF EPUB FB2

Idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) constitute one third of all epilepsies. They are genetically determined and affect otherwise normal people of both sexes and all races.

IGEs manifest with typical absences, myoclonic jerks, and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, alone or in varying combinations and severity. Absence status epilepticus (ASE) is common. Most syndromes of IGE start in. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Geist, Harold. Etiology of idiopathic epilepsy.

New York, Exposition Press [] (OCoLC) Online version. In this article, a classification (database) of the etiologies of epilepsy is proposed. In this scheme, the etiology of epilepsy is divided into four categories: idiopathic, symptomatic, provoked, and cryptogenic.

These are defined and subcategories are by: EPILEPSIES BY ETIOLOGY. In recent years there has been a significant expansion in our understanding of the underlying etiologies of the epilepsies, underpinned by advances in modern neuroimaging and genetic testing.

As such terminology such as 'idiopathic'. In this article, a classification (database) of the etiologies of epilepsy is proposed. In this scheme, the etiology of epilepsy is divided into four categories: idiopathic, symptomatic, provoked, and cryptogenic.

These are defined and subcategories are by:   Gastaut ,28 has also reviewed our present knowledge of the causes of temporal lobe epilepsy, which is a common form of focal etiology of idiopathic epilepsy.

book "partial" epilepsy. 12,24,35,51 However, this knowledge is still incomplete, and as Yakovlev 66 has pointed out, various lesions may be responsible. In this paper, therefore, we record the pathological findings in Cited by: Amy Kao, Pooja M.

Rao, in Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Abstract. The idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) are a spectrum of epilepsy syndromes that are characterized by seizures of generalized onset, and by known or presumed genetic etiology.

Definitions: 1) etiology = what's the cause. 2) idiopathic = "we don't know" 3) petit mal is a specific form of epilepsy only seen in childhood where a person br 2) idiopathic = "we don't know" 3) petit mal is a specific form of epilepsy only seen in childhood where a person br.

A seizure is the manifestation of an abnormal, hypersynchronous discharge of a population of cortical neurons. This discharge may produce subjective symptoms or objective signs, in which case it is a clinical seizure, or it may be apparent only on an electroencephalogram (EEG), in which case it is an electrographic (or subclinical) seizure.

Clinical seizures are usually classified according to. Partial epilepsies are epileptic disorders in which seizure semiology or findings on investigation disclose localized origin of seizures.

In children, cortical dysplasias and low-grade neoplasms are the most commonly identified causes. Partial epilepsies represent the most common type of adult-onset epilepsy. The book is divided into four etiological categories: idiopathic, symptomatic, cryptogenic, and provoked epilepsies.

Each chapter considers topics in a consistent fashion, dealing with the phenomenon of epilepsy in each etiology, including its epidemiology, clinical features and prognosis, and any specific aspects of treatment/5(4).

Readers expecting a unified exposition of the etiology and psychological patterns associated with epilepsy will be disappointed by Dr.

Geist's clinical potpourri. Substantial sections of the book are devoted to a pedestrian account of basic psychoanalytic theory and to the history, rationale, scoring, administration, and interpretation of a Author: Arthur C.

Traub. The third level is that of epilepsy syndrome, where a specific syndromic diagnosis can be made. The new classification incorporates etiology along each stage, emphasizing the need to consider etiology at each step of diagnosis, as it often carries significant treatment implications.

Read more. ILAE Classification of the epilepsies (). Epilepsy is a general term for the tendency to have seizures. Epilepsy is usually diagnosed only after a person has had more than one seizure. When identifiable, the causes of epilepsy usually.

William Lennox published his classic book Epilepsy and Related Disorders in (Lennox & Lennox, ), and this provides a summary of advanced contemporary thought on the topic of epilepsy etiology. He considered epilepsy to be due to a combination of: (1) genetic (essential) causes; (2) acquired causes; and (3) precipitating causes; and of Cited by: Sean Flynn, M.

Ali Babi, in Pharmacology and Therapeutics for Dentistry (Seventh Edition), Pathophysiology. The pathophysiology of epilepsy and seizures is diverse, accounting for the many different types of seizure disorders. However, one commonality across epilepsies is a disrupted balance between excitatory (via glutamatergic signaling) and inhibitory (via GABAergic signaling) drive.

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a group of epileptic disorders that are believed to have a strong underlying genetic basis. Patients with an IGE subtype are typically otherwise normal and have no structural brain abnormalities.

People also often have a family history of epilepsy and seem to have a genetically predisposed risk of seizures. IGE tends to manifest itself between early Specialty: Neurology.

The book is divided into four etiological categories: idiopathic, symptomatic, cryptogenic, and provoked epilepsies. Each chapter considers topics in a consistent fashion, dealing with the phenomenon of epilepsy in each etiology, including its epidemiology, clinical features and prognosis, and any specific aspects of treatment.

Hippocrates wrote the first book about epilepsy almost years ago. He rejected ideas regarding the divine etiology of epilepsy and concluded that the cause was excessive phlegm leading to abnormal brain consistency.

Hippocratic teachings were forgotten, and divine etiologies again dominated beliefs about epileptic seizures during medieval. been made aware that epilepsy is a medical condition and that it can, therefore, be treated medically and be controlled.

As a result, the number of patients with epilepsy seeking treatment is increasing rapidly. Epilepsy is a major public health problem in Kenya. For this reason a File Size: KB.

Idiopathic epilepsies and epileptic syndromes predominate childhood and adolescence epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical course and outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy and identify variables determining both early and long-term prognosis.

We followed children with newly diagnosed idiopathic epilepsy aged 1–14 years old, both prospectively and. The book is divided into four etiological categories: idiopathic, symptomatic, cryptogenic, and provoked epilepsies.

Each chapter considers topics in a consistent fashion, dealing with the phenomenon of epilepsy in each etiology, including its epidemiology, clinical features and prognosis, and any specific aspects of s: 1.The idiopathic generalised epilepsies (IGE) constitute roughly one-third of all epilepsies.

Etymologically, the term ‘idiopathic’ comes from the Greek word ‘idios’, which simply means ‘oneself’. An idiopathic syndrome therefore may be conceptualised as a disease unto itself, a .